13

While definitely not yet an established practice, another proposal to consider might be Jeni Tennison's Linked CSV (see examples), which adds "prolog lines" to describe the schema used in CSV files.


11

Take a look at what OpenStreetMap does. There's a page describing the nature of tile server disk usage. If you go up to zoom level 18 worldwide, you're talking about 91,625,968,981 tiles, which would take around 54000GB of disk space, but would mostly never be viewed. So I'm not sure if it would ever be a sensible approach, but having said that, I heard ...


11

Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) FASAB as a slighltly murky relationship with GAAP, but it's "the body that establishes GAAP for federal reporting entities." I believe it publishes what is referred to as GAAP in the document, "Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) 34, The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting ...


9

I think it would be foolish to try and replace the NAICS system. NAICS is the federal government's categorization system, and in my experience, it is also in use at the municipal level in the United States. Here's a longer description: NAICS was developed under the auspices of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and adopted in 1997 to replace the ...


9

ResumeRDF seems to be the most "ontological" approach to normalization of CV information. The W3C has another article about ResumeRDF with further links.


8

Transmodel is a not very widely used format for schedule data (alternative to GTFS). For real time data (alternative to GTFS-realtime): SIRI is an XML protocol used most heavily in Europe. You'll want to consider what formats developers are most aware of and any possible performance issues. TRANSMODEL has been adopted as the European experimental ...


8

This isn't widely used, because we just started working on it this year, but our Knight Foundation project, OpenElections, is developing specs for election results in the United States. You can see the latest specification on our Github wiki. We also have a format for election metadata. Project details at openelections.net.


6

Every standard is intended to serve a slightly different purpose. Even if we're talking messaging standards over HTTP, you have both REST and SOAP. (and before I get all of the SOAP haters commenting ... there is a ton of bad SOAP implementations, but not everything is documented oriented and meshes well with REST) Before we had SOAP there were standards ...


6

Schema.org is an ontology ("data standard") specifically for marking up HTML so that search engines can more easily extract structured data from otherwise unstructured data. Schema.org is very popular for marking up products (reusing the GoodRelations vocabulary), articles (reusing the rNews vocabulary), reviews, etc. If all you care about is search engines, ...


5

For the DFID example, we have outputs on both CSV and RDF, if you check here: http://data.gov.uk/organogram/department-for-international-development-0 Check the template downloads on the right side of the organogram tool (above) they are labelled by numbers. We produced a controlled spreadsheet that all departments fill in, upload and automatically ...


5

There's plenty of classifications for public procurement used in different countries, Common Procurement Vocabulary (mentioned above) being the standard in EU member states. To give you some links: Jose María Alvarez Rodríguez (while at the WESO research group) worked on product scheme classifications used in public procurement. This diagram shows his ...


5

The National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) is an XML-based system for defining "data in motion" (i.e., an on-the-wire format.) What distinguishes NIEM is 2 things: it is for standardizing the semantics of the exchange, not just the syntax; and it as much a process model as it is a technical model. That is, it (the NIEM organization) has developed a ...


5

Have a look at Open MapQuest. They offer the Nasa BlueMarble, Satellite and different versions of OSM for free. They only require you to attribute them and OSM, etc., and let them know if your app will exceed 4000 tiles per second. You could set up your own Geoserver instance, Windows based or whatever (it's a self contained Java app), use mapserver as a ...


5

Apart from MapBox mentioned by Harry I'd also recommend having a look at CartoDB which let's you harness the power of PosGIS without the hassle of maintaining your own server (at a price). Alternative solution is to get your own (virtual) server running and equip it with a 'geostack' of map server with database and then start building applications using map ...


5

I don't know much about open data standards, but as far as I'm aware, no. Stack Exchange itself isn't based on any particular standard. We provide all publicly-accessible data via an XML-based [data dump, but I believe its schema is simply mimicking the database schema we also expose via the Data Explorer.


5

I believe minopret is incorrect on the use restriction of UN/LOCODE to non-commercial use w/o permission. There is no where on the UNECE site that indicates such a restriction. All the verbage would indicate the contrary. The terms of use simply indicate that the material is w/o warranty and the user will indemify the UN. This statement can be found on the ...


5

I've also found IEEE P1622.2 - Standard for Election Results Reporting Data Interchange Format.


5

No, there isn't. The most in-depth analysis that I'm aware of is the 2011 paper by Renear, Sacchi and Wickett, "Definitions of dataset in the scientific and technical literature", in which they decided that there were four basic concepts that reoccurred (grouping, content, relatedness, purpose), but weren't completely consistent when dealing with different ...


5

I don't know of any existing standards (de facto or not) for extending NAICS, but what I would do is start with the NAICS Index File, which ties over 19,000 industry names to the standard 1,000 or so NAICS codes. Take the list of index entries for each NAICS, give each one a 2-digit sequential ID, and tack this onto the standard NAICS to make it 8-digit (...


4

I have recently started using the Linked CSV proposed standard for generating CSV files from plural data sources. Below is a vocabulary definition for the columns/data types I am using. Perhaps others will find this useful/interesting approach: http://www.opengeocode.org/cude1.1/LinkedCSV-Vocab.php Update: the above link throws a 404, however it is ...


4

To my knowledge, there is no standard model around open data. Simply put, each set of data has it's own unique characteristics and thus the API's that provide the data will also vary. Unless you're speaking about the technical format (XML or JSON), then that's a completely different discussion.


4

I think the best way to do this is to create a new activity with these classifications: recipient-region: code: 998 text: Bilateral/unspecified see IATI regions codelist sector: code: 91010 text: Administrative costs but maybe have a look to check there's not a more appropriate code: IATI Sectors codelist If there are administrative costs related to a ...


4

I think NAICS is useful, but it depends on what you're trying to categorize. In practice, NAICS is a self-reported industrial classification of the contractor, and not necessarily a classification of what is being purchased. In fact it was developed to make comparisons across business statistics easier. The federal contracting data has Product and Service ...


4

XBRL is a standard derived from XML that is gaining momentum for describing financial and business transactions. A good definition and set of practices is represented by the Security and Exchange Commission. It provides examples, APIs, and other technical information for accessing data from the SEC and for machine readable financial data using XBRL. The ...


4

In the United States, the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA) Act puts in place a requirement for U.S. federal spending to be in "open, standardized data, and to publish that data online." This will affects awards, appropriations, accounts, and payments. It may or may not have a secondary affect of bringing other financial reporting into this ...


4

open budget and open spending are what you are looking for: https://github.com/adstiles/openbudgetoakland https://openspending.org/ openspending csv format is basic, but still quite confusing, at least for me: you only need three columns: date, amount, unique id. from what i can tell, there is no way to automate this, and you're going to have to literally ...


4

The caniuse.com project includes compatabilities for many browsers versus CSS, HTML, JS API, SVG, and Other categories. "Can I use" provides up-to-date browser support tables for support of front-end web technologies on desktop and mobile web browsers. License is CC BY-NC 3.0. Raw data is on GitHub.


3

While I don't know about the US, a fallback may be looking at the Common Procurement Vocabulary (CPV) used throughout the European Union. It's a bit weird but fairly detailed and since it's already in use in the EU member states and a few countries beyond that, it may be a nice thing to use further: https://github.com/opented/opented/tree/master/cpvcodes


3

You hit on a particularly relevant pain-point when it comes to procurement data. The purchasing thresholds differ wildly across the map, and there isn't any universal standard for classification. I maintain an open-source project at http://openprocure.us that, while far from being close to comprehensive, is an effort in the right direction.


3

You attach a result to a specific activity, so in this case the Legal and Procedural Change and Communication Activity. The should be nested within that activity. You can have many results, which are just siblings. A single result should look something like this: <result type="2"> <title>Stakeholders reached by public outreach efforts</...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible