11

Take a look at what OpenStreetMap does. There's a page describing the nature of tile server disk usage. If you go up to zoom level 18 worldwide, you're talking about 91,625,968,981 tiles, which would take around 54000GB of disk space, but would mostly never be viewed. So I'm not sure if it would ever be a sensible approach, but having said that, I heard ...


11

Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) FASAB as a slighltly murky relationship with GAAP, but it's "the body that establishes GAAP for federal reporting entities." I believe it publishes what is referred to as GAAP in the document, "Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) 34, The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting ...


9

ResumeRDF seems to be the most "ontological" approach to normalization of CV information. The W3C has another article about ResumeRDF with further links.


8

This isn't widely used, because we just started working on it this year, but our Knight Foundation project, OpenElections, is developing specs for election results in the United States. You can see the latest specification on our Github wiki. We also have a format for election metadata. Project details at openelections.net.


8

Transmodel is a not very widely used format for schedule data (alternative to GTFS). For real time data (alternative to GTFS-realtime): SIRI is an XML protocol used most heavily in Europe. You'll want to consider what formats developers are most aware of and any possible performance issues. TRANSMODEL has been adopted as the European experimental ...


5

I don't know much about open data standards, but as far as I'm aware, no. Stack Exchange itself isn't based on any particular standard. We provide all publicly-accessible data via an XML-based [data dump, but I believe its schema is simply mimicking the database schema we also expose via the Data Explorer.


5

Have a look at Open MapQuest. They offer the Nasa BlueMarble, Satellite and different versions of OSM for free. They only require you to attribute them and OSM, etc., and let them know if your app will exceed 4000 tiles per second. You could set up your own Geoserver instance, Windows based or whatever (it's a self contained Java app), use mapserver as a ...


5

Apart from MapBox mentioned by Harry I'd also recommend having a look at CartoDB which let's you harness the power of PosGIS without the hassle of maintaining your own server (at a price). Alternative solution is to get your own (virtual) server running and equip it with a 'geostack' of map server with database and then start building applications using map ...


5

The National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) is an XML-based system for defining "data in motion" (i.e., an on-the-wire format.) What distinguishes NIEM is 2 things: it is for standardizing the semantics of the exchange, not just the syntax; and it as much a process model as it is a technical model. That is, it (the NIEM organization) has developed a ...


5

I've also found IEEE P1622.2 - Standard for Election Results Reporting Data Interchange Format.


5

I believe minopret is incorrect on the use restriction of UN/LOCODE to non-commercial use w/o permission. There is no where on the UNECE site that indicates such a restriction. All the verbage would indicate the contrary. The terms of use simply indicate that the material is w/o warranty and the user will indemify the UN. This statement can be found on the ...


5

No, there isn't. The most in-depth analysis that I'm aware of is the 2011 paper by Renear, Sacchi and Wickett, "Definitions of dataset in the scientific and technical literature", in which they decided that there were four basic concepts that reoccurred (grouping, content, relatedness, purpose), but weren't completely consistent when dealing with different ...


5

I don't know of any existing standards (de facto or not) for extending NAICS, but what I would do is start with the NAICS Index File, which ties over 19,000 industry names to the standard 1,000 or so NAICS codes. Take the list of index entries for each NAICS, give each one a 2-digit sequential ID, and tack this onto the standard NAICS to make it 8-digit (...


4

In the United States, the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA) Act puts in place a requirement for U.S. federal spending to be in "open, standardized data, and to publish that data online." This will affects awards, appropriations, accounts, and payments. It may or may not have a secondary affect of bringing other financial reporting into this ...


4

I have recently started using the Linked CSV proposed standard for generating CSV files from plural data sources. Below is a vocabulary definition for the columns/data types I am using. Perhaps others will find this useful/interesting approach: http://www.opengeocode.org/cude1.1/LinkedCSV-Vocab.php Update: the above link throws a 404, however it is ...


4

open budget and open spending are what you are looking for: https://github.com/adstiles/openbudgetoakland https://openspending.org/ openspending csv format is basic, but still quite confusing, at least for me: you only need three columns: date, amount, unique id. from what i can tell, there is no way to automate this, and you're going to have to literally ...


4

The caniuse.com project includes compatabilities for many browsers versus CSS, HTML, JS API, SVG, and Other categories. "Can I use" provides up-to-date browser support tables for support of front-end web technologies on desktop and mobile web browsers. License is CC BY-NC 3.0. Raw data is on GitHub.


3

Christopher Groskopf developed the invar library to generate tiles from a mapnik XML file. It may not be a great fit for your case, if you really want worldwide coverage, but it is a useful tool for generating tiles for a given bounding box and then efficiently uploading them to Amazon S3.


3

You hit on a particularly relevant pain-point when it comes to procurement data. The purchasing thresholds differ wildly across the map, and there isn't any universal standard for classification. I maintain an open-source project at http://openprocure.us that, while far from being close to comprehensive, is an effort in the right direction.


3

It looks like Jeni Tennison took her Linked CSV spec to the W3C, and with some help from Gregg Kellogg and Ivan Herman it evolved into the Model for Tabular Data and Metadata on the Web and the Metadata Vocabulary for Tabular Data that both appeared as a W3C candidate recommendation on 16 July, 2015. Altogether, four CSV-related recommendations have appeared;...


3

The Data Documentation Initiative provides the DDI metadata standard for describing data dictionaries. http://www.ddialliance.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_Documentation_Initiative The DDI standard is broadly used and maintained by a large consortium of Universities and government organizations.


3

From having been an elected municipal official (although for a really small municipality), I found that you generally had to look at how a given line item changed from year to year. (eg, this line was up 30% from last year). Of course, this means that when they start re-classifying expenses, or moving them around between departments, it's more difficult to ...


3

Civic Common's Open Data Guidelines seem to be the default reference for most standards that I'm aware of. It's important to point out that Civic Commons is not a government entity/agency, however everyone involved in the project that I am aware of works for/has worked for/works with government to see these guidelines come to life. There are some references ...


3

There does not seem to be a separate data standard for CAFR, but you may want to consider XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language). The State of Oregon piloted providing CAFR in XBRL format and there are some tools that exist to help provide XBLR formats of a CARF.


3

Two standards you may wish to consider are XBRL and Frictionless Data. I have been working on a municipal XBRL taxonomy with others. You can see the current status here: https://github.com/govwiki/us_municipal_cafr_taxonomy For more on the application of Frictionless Data to fiscal reporting see: https://frictionlessdata.io/specs/fiscal-data-package/


2

Progress Report Examples: NYC, by the city: http://www.nyc.gov/html/static/pages/roadmap/open_government.shtml NYC, by Reinvent Albany: http://reinventalbany.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/nyc.opendata.challenges.final.pdf Philadelphia Report Card: http://technical.ly/philly/2013/05/02/philadelphia-open-data-executive-order/ Philadelphia's New ...


2

Regarding formats, in Mexico we are pushing forward the idea of using REST in most of the cases. REST architectures are resource-oriented, thus making them accessible directly through a URL. This follows the open data principle of accessibility. Most users will not be able to craft a XML request to get the data from a SOAP interface. Compare that to ...


2

Every Stack Exchange site comes with a "Creative Commons with Attribution and Share Alike" statement. I would consider that an Open Data Standard. You are allowed to: to Share - to copy, distribute and transmit the work to Remix — to adapt the work to make commercial use of the work (Source: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)


2

I actually no longer recommend CartoDB (which has since been renamed to CARTO), although I was once a power user and helped build the platform from its open-source days. For maptile hosting, I'd go with MapBox at the moment.


2

The Text Encoding Initiative's XML language has a module for "Performance Texts" by which they mean plays, screenplays, and other sorts of scripts. If you're looking for very prescriptive rules, TEI will disappoint you (there's usually more than one way to do anything in TEI!), but if you want a hospitable markup language with a lot of existing scaffolding, ...


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