Hot answers tagged

13

If you already have a nicely formatted CSV then why not publish that? You can publish in both formats if you really want to do the RDFa too.


12

Wikidata RDF dumps have been available since 3-Aug-2013. http://www.mail-archive.com/wikidata-l@lists.wikimedia.org/msg02553.html If you're interested in topics related to Wikidata, I'd suggest subscribing to their mailing list. Of course, both Freebase and DBpedia have had much larger dumps available for years.


11

The wikidata dump is already available. As of now, the last (mostly) complete dump is from 5 May 2013 and it includes the dump of pages in the important namespaces (pages-articles.xml).


9

The W3C offers a collection of tools that convert from CSV to RDF. However, there is no explicit mention of RDFa in any of these CSV converters. Personally, I'd give the RDF Refine plugin for OpenRefine a try. Once you have your open data in an RDF format, you could use the RDF Translator to turn it into RDFa.


9

Well my comment received a number of up votes which I take as a signal of quality and I am posting the links here so they are more visible to future visitors: opendata.socrata.com - you can upload a number of different file types here, create visualizations, link to them, and take advantage of a very mature set of APIs for data consumption and publishing ...


9

In addition to @enridaga's great answer, let me offer a few additional thoughts. RDFa is (only) useful if you already have HTML content that you want to enrich with semantic data. RDF/XML is very well readable for machines, but not so much for humans. N-Triples, Turtle or N3 are currently pretty much the default formats for Linked Data dumps. For example, ...


8

So you have a CSV file and you want to publish it as linked data in a RDF format, not CSV. The core part of the work here is the translation to RDF, that implies, as @andrew-opengeocode suggested in his answer, that you find one or more RDF ontologies/vocabularies that define terms you can reuse to model your data. The more popular are the terms you reuse, ...


7

While there is clear power with RDF and other formal ontologies, web technologies are showing a tendency towards simplicity -- things that are easy to code, read, manipulate, etc. RDF has none of those qualities. So while a language like Ruby might evolve on its own, it gains more power, popularity and community when a platform that makes development more ...


6

The W3C hosts a list of large triple stores with documented deployments and numbers of triples. The top contenders with more than 10B triples currently are: AllegroGraph (1Trillion+) Stardog (50B) Oracle Spatial and Graph with Oracle Database (48B+) OpenLink Virtuoso v6.1 (15.4B+) Ontotext GraphDB (formerly BigOWLIM) (12B+) Garlik 4store (15B) Bigdata (12....


6

The Wikidata database is currently offered for download in several different formats: The full XML dumps have been available for quite some time. However, they require parsing to extract the actual JSON data from the enclosing XML file. Since July 2014 there are also pure JSON dumps available. In addition, Wikidata now also provides official RDF exports.


5

In order to make it into Linked Data and be easily reusable by as many mashups/apps/etc as possible.. It seems you are talking about RDF dumps, but there are other ways to provide access to RDF data, at least the following: SPARQL endpoint, URI dereferencing. These ways are more convenient for the goals you are trying to achieve. We have open data as a ...


5

First off, you can use CSV as a Linked Open Data (LOD) serialization format. This has been the case since 2009 (early days of LOD cloud, demonstrated via DBpedia; just look in the footer of any of DBpedia's entity description pages). There's even a Linked CSV draft spect in regards to this matter (there are even CSV Browsers). The only downside is that ...


5

RDF is unpopular because it is generally misunderstood. This problem arises (primarily) from how RDF has been presented to the market in general. To understand RDF you have to first understand what Data actually is [1], once you cross that hurdle two things [2][3] will become obvious: RDF is extremely useful in regards to all issues relating to Data RDF has ...


5

Here's my 2 cents. Since your data is already in CSV format, the fastest way to add semantic context is to use ODI's 'Linked CSV' format: (http://jenit.github.io/linked-csv/). You will need to pick a vocabulary. Without knowing about your data, I would start by looking at existing [semi]standardized data vocabularies. For example, a large number of datasets ...


5

Depending on your use-case Wikidata toolkit is a Java tool that allows you to iterate over all the items in a dump. In fact it auto-downloads the latest dump and translates the entire model into Java objects. This means everything is abstracted and you just have to write the call-back to be applied to each item. I wrote a tutorial on how to use it in ...


5

RDF has many different serializations (or formats); there is no "RDF format". As you say it’s XML, it’s most likely the RDF/XML serialization. You should not use a usual XML parser to work with it; you’ll want to work on the RDF triple level instead. So you need an RDF-aware tool that can input RDF/XML; or you can convert your file from RDF/XML to a more ...


5

Speaking as a practitioner, this is my best understanding of the open-world-assumption - I never really found a good explanation of its impacts. I would kindly invite anyone to correct or extend on this post, as it would allow me to learn as well. The open world assumption pertains to the "web" part of the Semantic Web - i.e., its open, distributed nature. ...


4

I'm not sure I agree that you need to have any URI to demonstrate how open a set of data is. Either the data is open and shareable or it is not, the openness of the data is described by the openness of the data. Let's say I publish a set of RDF linked data, as soon as it is published it is open to be consumed as a whole or in part, people can take which ...


3

Knoema is the free to use public and open data platform for users with interests in statistics and data analysis, visual storytelling and making infographics and data-driven presentations


3

I have experience of working with RDF in Python. I don't know if it is suitable for you. In specific, I have used the library RDFlib. from rdflib import Graph g = Graph() g.parse("http://bigasterisk.com/foaf.rdf") From now on, you have two options. Query the graph with SPARQL or parse the file with triples. With SPARQL: qres = g.query( """SELECT ...


3

I see three drivers for this true observation: 1.) I'm a very observing information technologist I would say and RDF has been on my radar for I would say 6 years. My sentiment towards RDF until about one year was: Very popular in academia Complex if you want to do advanced stuff Clearly the basis for the Web 3.0 but needs time 2.) Considering the the ...


3

This is not RDFa, but rather embedded RDF/XML, which is allowed by the SVG Tiny 1.2 Specification. There are the following errors: <cc:license> instead of <cc:License> in lines 26, 29 and 30, 33. The former is a property, the latter is a class. <cc:attributionName rdf:resource="Laurent Notarianni and LittleMap.org" /> <cc:...


3

The current situation of your data Data tables in PDF (example from your forestry statistics page) are a great example of 1-star data: The data is on the web, but it's pretty much unusable for computer programs without some heavy-duty data extraction. After all, PDF is where data goes to die. My advice: Just don't do it. Your example Excel file is actually ...


3

The Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, published by one of your employer's (?) customers, is known now as Psychology Ontology. This ontology is not even a taxonomy, but rather a flat list of classes. BioPortal provides mappings between this ontology and many other ontologies. Additionally, BioPortal contains other ontologies published by APA: The ...


3

Before building a completely new system from scratch, you should first check if an existing system satisfies your requirements. There are a few possible candidates out there: As outlined in this answer, D2RQ and RDF HDT might be close to what you are looking for. In addition there is Tarql which provides SPARQL access to CSV files — which is, as far as I ...


3

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. ORCID also has ResearcherID integration. ORCID.js is ...


3

Q1: Are all DBpedia concepts associated with its relevent wikidata ID? Those kind of links are usually generated by the people on either side into the direction of the other side. Since it is sometimes very hard to automatically detect links, it is very unlikely that a link between all concepts, properties or entities exist. If you are interested in the ...


2

"What needs to be done to move from, say a 3-star level where a simple table is made available in a CSV file up to levels 4 and 5?" To jump from level 3 to level 4, the csv data needs to be converted to RDF. You could display it in an html document, and mark it up with RDFa. You could also serialize it to JSON-LD or Turtle. If you view the example for ...


2

I would suggest just uploading it to https://data.world (disclaimer: I work there, but it's free). It's easy for other users to get it in a few different ways (whether it's a download, API, or a SPARQL endpoint) without you having to do a thing. This should give re-users ultimate flexibility without you having to do anything but drag-and-drop. If you have ...


2

While I don't feel particularly authoritative, I hate to see a question with several votes go completely unanswered for so long, so I'll take a crack. Unfortunately, I am pretty sure this is not an area with wide adoption. Several google searches have this very question among the top hits. So there doesn't seem to be a lot of prior art to go on. There does ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible