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5

After asking, I found via Googling a series from the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) called the Law Enforcement Agency Identifiers Crosswalk. Here is its description from the NACJD website: The crosswalk file is designed to provide geographic and other identification information for each record included in either the Federal Bureau of ...


4

Suffolk Police Department's annual reports document most of this data, but only for a couple of years. pretty sure they have it for 2006-2008 or 2009. you'll have to check, but the data is there: http://www.suffolkva.us/spd/inside/annualreports/


3

This is a difficult question (one that is facing healthcare in the US right now -- taking free text and creating structured medical data suitable for analysis and reporting). There are many ontologies you can query against depending on your needs. It is a big endeavor regardless of how far you dive in. If you want a really formal, complete system (total ...


3

drug names....technical terms or street terms? technical terms i'm assuming will be on cdc or openfda or perhaps both. i've been hearing about openfda much more lately, so i would check them out first. here's a medical glossary that you could scrape, it seems pretty in-depth but i have no idea what i'm looking at and/or how or what to compare it to: http://...


3

First thought: ICD-10, the current international classification of diseases by WHO: http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/en/ I am not sure if this helps, escpecially in regard to drug names.


2

It's important to remember that police jurisdictions generally follow administrative boundaries (in fact it's probably always this way). A city police force will only have jurisdiction within the city limits. What you're looking for is a dataset of administrative boundaries. Generally speaking, the Office of Management and Budget, the agency responsible for ...


2

This is similar to another question, and so I'll post a more detailed and updated answer here that might be useful, too. There are quite a few cities that publish this data. A quick way to find it, is via Data.gov, which provides local government as well as federal government data. There are 40 city crime statistics datasets published, most of which ...


2

The NLM's UMLS Metathesaurus http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/umls/knowledge_sources/metathesaurus/ is a possibility but, there is some non-trivial technical overhead to using it. You can, however, get it at no cost. You might check out FDA's NDC database file. Perhaps that will help you. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/InformationOnDrugs/ucm142438.htm You can ...


1

Not yet; the FBI announced they will launch one in 2019-01. There are a number of fourth estate/civic activist databases, but no authoritative, government database, that I am aware of.


1

Here's two you can piece together: Agency Participation Data in FBI NIBRS from FBI Crime Data Explorer (not open) Directory of Law Enforcement Agencies, 1996: [United States] (ICPSR 2260)


1

http://www.fatalencounters.org/ Not specifically about misconduct, but attempts to be a database of all fatal encounters will U.S. law enforcement.


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Unfortunately, from PoliceMisconduct.net's own FAQ: Why do this? Simply because nobody else does. Only a small fraction of the 17,000 law enforcement agencies actually track their own misconduct in a semi-public manner, and even when they do, the data they provide is generic and does not specify what misconduct occurred, who did it, and what the end ...


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