9

In addition to @enridaga's great answer, let me offer a few additional thoughts. RDFa is (only) useful if you already have HTML content that you want to enrich with semantic data. RDF/XML is very well readable for machines, but not so much for humans. N-Triples, Turtle or N3 are currently pretty much the default formats for Linked Data dumps. For example, ...


8

So you have a CSV file and you want to publish it as linked data in a RDF format, not CSV. The core part of the work here is the translation to RDF, that implies, as @andrew-opengeocode suggested in his answer, that you find one or more RDF ontologies/vocabularies that define terms you can reuse to model your data. The more popular are the terms you reuse, ...


7

While there is clear power with RDF and other formal ontologies, web technologies are showing a tendency towards simplicity -- things that are easy to code, read, manipulate, etc. RDF has none of those qualities. So while a language like Ruby might evolve on its own, it gains more power, popularity and community when a platform that makes development more ...


6

The two links below are NOAA/NWS weather terms used in their datasets: This document is the vocabulary for the annual summaries: http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cdo/documentation/ANNUAL_documentation.pdf This document is the vocabulary for the daily summaries http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cdo/documentation/GHCND_documentation.pdf These are a ...


6

The W3C hosts a list of large triple stores with documented deployments and numbers of triples. The top contenders with more than 10B triples currently are: AllegroGraph (1Trillion+) Stardog (50B) Oracle Spatial and Graph with Oracle Database (48B+) OpenLink Virtuoso v6.1 (15.4B+) Ontotext GraphDB (formerly BigOWLIM) (12B+) Garlik 4store (15B) Bigdata (12....


6

The BBC has written a fair bit about its use of linked data: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/posts/BBC-News-Lab http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2010/07/bbc_world_cup_2010_dynamic_sem.html


6

Schema.org is an ontology ("data standard") specifically for marking up HTML so that search engines can more easily extract structured data from otherwise unstructured data. Schema.org is very popular for marking up products (reusing the GoodRelations vocabulary), articles (reusing the rNews vocabulary), reviews, etc. If all you care about is search engines, ...


5

Archive.org might have already crawled the site for you. Check out the Way Back Machine: http://wayback.archive.org/web/query?type=urlquery&url=&Submit=Go+Wayback!


5

I would use purl.org yes. That's weird that they're not answering. They answered pretty quickly when I tried myself. There's also https://w3id.org/ if you're looking for stable and persistent identifiers. The best however could also simply be to publish the vocabulary yourself. One of the issues with using URIs for the vocabulary of your data is that there'...


5

My currently favoured text editor jEdit has a simple yet effective word completion feature (Menu Edit > Complete word; default shortcut Ctrl+B). It takes its word list from the opened document and includes keywords of the file's programming language (in case it is code). Word-delimiting characters can be user-defined as described on the page Working with ...


5

First off, you can use CSV as a Linked Open Data (LOD) serialization format. This has been the case since 2009 (early days of LOD cloud, demonstrated via DBpedia; just look in the footer of any of DBpedia's entity description pages). There's even a Linked CSV draft spect in regards to this matter (there are even CSV Browsers). The only downside is that ...


5

RDF is unpopular because it is generally misunderstood. This problem arises (primarily) from how RDF has been presented to the market in general. To understand RDF you have to first understand what Data actually is [1], once you cross that hurdle two things [2][3] will become obvious: RDF is extremely useful in regards to all issues relating to Data RDF has ...


5

Here's my 2 cents. Since your data is already in CSV format, the fastest way to add semantic context is to use ODI's 'Linked CSV' format: (http://jenit.github.io/linked-csv/). You will need to pick a vocabulary. Without knowing about your data, I would start by looking at existing [semi]standardized data vocabularies. For example, a large number of datasets ...


5

We (met.no) plan on publishing a JSON-LD vocabulary for climate/weather data, when we release our public portal later this year. We'll be publishing JSON-LD ourselves as our primary data format. To the best of my knowledge, there isn't anything else stable out there yet suitable for this kind of use. The closest you get, AFAIK, is http://codes.wmo.int/


5

The common vocabulary for weather data is the Weather Exchange Model (WXXM). Read more here: https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/NNEWD/WXXM


5

In order to make it into Linked Data and be easily reusable by as many mashups/apps/etc as possible.. It seems you are talking about RDF dumps, but there are other ways to provide access to RDF data, at least the following: SPARQL endpoint, URI dereferencing. These ways are more convenient for the goals you are trying to achieve. We have open data as a ...


5

In 2006, Tim Berners-Lee defined the four rules of Linked Data: Use URIs as names for things Use HTTP URIs so that people can look up those names. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information, using the standards (RDF*, SPARQL) Include links to other URIs. so that they can discover more things. In 2010, he introduced the 5 star ...


5

You could do it with SPARQL: SELECT ?wdLabel ?ooLabel WHERE { VALUES (?s) {(wd:Q42)} ?s ?wdt ?o . ?wd wikibase:directClaim ?wdt . ?wd rdfs:label ?wdLabel . OPTIONAL { ?o rdfs:label ?oLabel . FILTER (lang(?oLabel) = "en") } FILTER (lang(?wdLabel) = "en") BIND (COALESCE(?oLabel, ?o) AS ?ooLabel) } ORDER BY xsd:integer(STRAFTER(STR(?wd)...


4

The best is to host your mapping directly on Wikidata. The property is https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Property:P1482 For instance, https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q859221 represents Java Swing, and has https://stackoverflow.com/tags/swing as a Stack Exchange tag property: [...] License: public domain


4

essentially you need to: validate your dataset with ckan lod validator publish dataset add it to ckan "so that it appears in the next version of the lod cloud diagram" Reference: http://datahub.io/group/about/lodcloud


4

The best place to start looking is Linked Open Vocabularies. As of February 2015 they have indexed more than 450 vocabularies and ontologies and provide a convenient search feature.


4

R, the open source and cross-platform statistics software has something similar where sometimes packages/plugins for R include sample or test data: See this SO question: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12391195/include-data-examples-in-developing-r-packages and this info page: http://r-pkgs.had.co.nz/data.html OKFN (the same folks behind CKAN) has ...


4

If by "relevant parts" you mean the video IDs, I think those alone could be considered URIs, but not very good ones, as they do identify the resource, but not unambiguously. If I ask you to find me 4x_xzT5eF5Q, that could be difficult because there could be any number of things named 4x_xzT5eF5Q, and that name tells you nothing about what the thing I expect ...


4

I'm not sure I agree that you need to have any URI to demonstrate how open a set of data is. Either the data is open and shareable or it is not, the openness of the data is described by the openness of the data. Let's say I publish a set of RDF linked data, as soon as it is published it is open to be consumed as a whole or in part, people can take which ...


3

I use Sublime Text, and a number of plugins using package control. Most usefully this Turtle plugin that autocompletes things based on what you've already typed: https://github.com/abcoates/sublime-text-turtle-sparql This is assuming you're writing in Turtle, and therefore using prefixes. If I'm working in other RDF formats, I use Jena rdfcat to transform ...


3

This site used JSON-LD to markup their recipes and successfully got rich snippets in Google: http://gracessweetlife.com/2010/06/cannoli-siciliani-the-ultimate-italian-pastry/ Example query: https://www.google.pt/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=ikWyVdPPOLLj8wfKrIyABg&gws_rd=ssl#q=grace%27s+cannoli+and+cannoli+filling+recipe A very important move forward in terms of ...


3

There's a conversation going on about this within the OpenNews community, which may have interesting info for you. Dan Sinker wrote an article on the topic for Source, see http://source.mozillaopennews.org/en-US/articles/us-shutdown-scuttles-data/. Also, during the October 9 OpenNews call, there was a detailed discussion about access to government open ...


3

I see three drivers for this true observation: 1.) I'm a very observing information technologist I would say and RDF has been on my radar for I would say 6 years. My sentiment towards RDF until about one year was: Very popular in academia Complex if you want to do advanced stuff Clearly the basis for the Web 3.0 but needs time 2.) Considering the the ...


3

Yes there are several resources. www.bio2rdf.org is probably the best known. To easily browse linked data try www.distilbio.com


3

According to DBpedia as Tables, DBpedia uses the following data to create the tables: Each instance is described by its URI, an English label and a short abstract, the mapping-based infobox data describing the instance (extracted from the English edition of Wikipedia), geo-coordinates, and external links. DBpedia basically provides two different types of ...


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