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19

Data can be open but not linked, or linked but not open. "Linked data" refers to data that is machine readable, semantic data, that a machine can 'understand'. The "semantic meaning" comes from the links, hence the names. "Open Data" refers to data that is accessible to anyone (e.g. without monetary cost to access) with a permissive license on reuse (e.g. ...


15

I'm maintaining a list of early adopter in the JSON-LD Wiki If you want a more visual representation, you might wanna look at http://slideshare.net/lanthaler/building-next-generation-web-ap-is-with-jsonld-and-hydra/34


10

I would love to answer this, but I have no idea what "strong linked data" means. These techniques have been used in a lot of products, the dbpedia.org system has been used by a number of systems, ranging from Watson (maybe IBM is considered too academic) to Siri (I don't think Apple is an academic group). Schema.org and Facebook's Open Graph Protocol are ...


9

Google supports JSON-LD for embedding structured data in emails. From their developer documentation: Gmail, Search Answer Cards, and Google Now rely on structured data in emails to work. Schemas in Gmail supports both JSON-LD and Microdata and you can use either of them to markup information in email. This lets Google understand the fields and provide ...


9

On the GitHub repo for JSON-LD, they have a list of users. Here are three projects from that list and how they use it: PaySwarm uses it to "sign digital contracts" graphite.js uses it for "parsing and serializing" The Digital Public Library of America API returns all results in JSON-LD


9

In addition to @enridaga's great answer, let me offer a few additional thoughts. RDFa is (only) useful if you already have HTML content that you want to enrich with semantic data. RDF/XML is very well readable for machines, but not so much for humans. N-Triples, Turtle or N3 are currently pretty much the default formats for Linked Data dumps. For example, ...


8

So you have a CSV file and you want to publish it as linked data in a RDF format, not CSV. The core part of the work here is the translation to RDF, that implies, as @andrew-opengeocode suggested in his answer, that you find one or more RDF ontologies/vocabularies that define terms you can reuse to model your data. The more popular are the terms you reuse, ...


7

The Digital Public Library of America uses JSON-LD http://dp.la/info/developers/codex/


7

While there is clear power with RDF and other formal ontologies, web technologies are showing a tendency towards simplicity -- things that are easy to code, read, manipulate, etc. RDF has none of those qualities. So while a language like Ruby might evolve on its own, it gains more power, popularity and community when a platform that makes development more ...


6

I'm not aware of any list of metadata in microdata format especially for legislation. Certainly there doesn't seem to be one at schema.org, although some parts of GovernmentOrganization would be applicable. Concomitant with the existence of a governmental entity is, of course, the jurisdiction with which it's associated. For some uses, AdministrativeArea ...


6

The BBC has written a fair bit about its use of linked data: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/posts/BBC-News-Lab http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2010/07/bbc_world_cup_2010_dynamic_sem.html


6

Schema.org is an ontology ("data standard") specifically for marking up HTML so that search engines can more easily extract structured data from otherwise unstructured data. Schema.org is very popular for marking up products (reusing the GoodRelations vocabulary), articles (reusing the rNews vocabulary), reviews, etc. If all you care about is search engines, ...


6

The two links below are NOAA/NWS weather terms used in their datasets: This document is the vocabulary for the annual summaries: http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cdo/documentation/ANNUAL_documentation.pdf This document is the vocabulary for the daily summaries http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cdo/documentation/GHCND_documentation.pdf These are a ...


6

The W3C hosts a list of large triple stores with documented deployments and numbers of triples. The top contenders with more than 10B triples currently are: AllegroGraph (1Trillion+) Stardog (50B) Oracle Spatial and Graph with Oracle Database (48B+) OpenLink Virtuoso v6.1 (15.4B+) Ontotext GraphDB (formerly BigOWLIM) (12B+) Garlik 4store (15B) Bigdata (12....


6

In 2006, Tim Berners-Lee defined the four rules of Linked Data: Use URIs as names for things Use HTTP URIs so that people can look up those names. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information, using the standards (RDF*, SPARQL) Include links to other URIs. so that they can discover more things. In 2010, he introduced the 5 star ...


5

I think it's semi-abandoned, but there are various levels of details for 1,300 models here: https://www.freebase.com/digicams/digital_camera?instances If nothing else, the schema might provide a starting point for informing the types of information to collect.


5

Poderopedia uses Linked Data, as you mention. I have developed a few of my own as well: http://datos.gob.cl/aplicaciones?filterby=privada is a mobile webapp based on Linked Data that shows bioequivalent drugs, according to information from the chilean government http://graves.cl/ghi shows the global hunger index, based on data published in RDF by Tim Davies....


5

I would suggest: When dereferencing the root URL, point to a metadata document (via RDFa and/or conneg), say http://yoursite.com/meta. When dereferencing this document, provide a description of datasets using DCAT. every URI there, when dereferenced can show metadata (file size, creation dates, etc) and include a dcat:downloadURl link with the actual data. ...


5

I'll take a stab... On the web, there's only one sure way to display something related to a piece of text/number/whatever - hyperlinking (yes, there are tooltips, but they aren't likely to be discoverable or accessible). If you are using HTML tables, linked notes are OK. Ideally, users should be able to trace the origins (and the full chain of ...


5

Archive.org might have already crawled the site for you. Check out the Way Back Machine: http://wayback.archive.org/web/query?type=urlquery&url=&Submit=Go+Wayback!


5

My currently favoured text editor jEdit has a simple yet effective word completion feature (Menu Edit > Complete word; default shortcut Ctrl+B). It takes its word list from the opened document and includes keywords of the file's programming language (in case it is code). Word-delimiting characters can be user-defined as described on the page Working with ...


5

I would use purl.org yes. That's weird that they're not answering. They answered pretty quickly when I tried myself. There's also https://w3id.org/ if you're looking for stable and persistent identifiers. The best however could also simply be to publish the vocabulary yourself. One of the issues with using URIs for the vocabulary of your data is that there'...


5

RDF is unpopular because it is generally misunderstood. This problem arises (primarily) from how RDF has been presented to the market in general. To understand RDF you have to first understand what Data actually is [1], once you cross that hurdle two things [2][3] will become obvious: RDF is extremely useful in regards to all issues relating to Data RDF has ...


5

The common vocabulary for weather data is the Weather Exchange Model (WXXM). Read more here: https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/NNEWD/WXXM


5

We (met.no) plan on publishing a JSON-LD vocabulary for climate/weather data, when we release our public portal later this year. We'll be publishing JSON-LD ourselves as our primary data format. To the best of my knowledge, there isn't anything else stable out there yet suitable for this kind of use. The closest you get, AFAIK, is http://codes.wmo.int/


5

Here's my 2 cents. Since your data is already in CSV format, the fastest way to add semantic context is to use ODI's 'Linked CSV' format: (http://jenit.github.io/linked-csv/). You will need to pick a vocabulary. Without knowing about your data, I would start by looking at existing [semi]standardized data vocabularies. For example, a large number of datasets ...


5

First off, you can use CSV as a Linked Open Data (LOD) serialization format. This has been the case since 2009 (early days of LOD cloud, demonstrated via DBpedia; just look in the footer of any of DBpedia's entity description pages). There's even a Linked CSV draft spect in regards to this matter (there are even CSV Browsers). The only downside is that ...


5

In order to make it into Linked Data and be easily reusable by as many mashups/apps/etc as possible.. It seems you are talking about RDF dumps, but there are other ways to provide access to RDF data, at least the following: SPARQL endpoint, URI dereferencing. These ways are more convenient for the goals you are trying to achieve. We have open data as a ...


5

You could do it with SPARQL: SELECT ?wdLabel ?ooLabel WHERE { VALUES (?s) {(wd:Q42)} ?s ?wdt ?o . ?wd wikibase:directClaim ?wdt . ?wd rdfs:label ?wdLabel . OPTIONAL { ?o rdfs:label ?oLabel . FILTER (lang(?oLabel) = "en") } FILTER (lang(?wdLabel) = "en") BIND (COALESCE(?oLabel, ?o) AS ?ooLabel) } ORDER BY xsd:integer(STRAFTER(STR(?wd)...


4

My issue would be what the purpose of displaying the provenance is. As I've suggested in some of my questions on here, some of my concerns are about tracing the issues that might be in the data, and sometimes you have to go back and look to see how it's been processed and what it's derived from to tell what the possible issues might be. (eg I've run into ...


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