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25

I have worked for numerous companies in the past who have had a policy of not using any software, libraries, or datasets that would impose requirements on their product, this would include the attribution clause in the CC-BY licence. Placing a dataset in the public domain will maximise its potential audience; whether or not this is more desirable than ...


12

The legal text of CC-BY is quite complex, and has more terms than simple attribution, such as not implying the author endorses your work. Although such terms such as this may be useful, they make the license incompatible with other licenses (including the GPL http://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.html#ccby). I'm not sure whether this includes any common ...


12

A major part of the problem has to do with interpretation gray areas and where these give rise to concerns, warranted or not, regarding license compatibility or other issues. For example the question of compatibility between the CC-BY and the GNU GPL is a relatively complicated one and it boils down to "well, how do you read these two licenses?" And ...


11

As a work of the US government, there isn't any license appropriate for the work, because it's already in the public domain (in the United States). So a license like the Unlicense (or CC0), in which the licensor is entering the covered work into the public domain, doesn't work. Some text that acknowledges the public domain status in the US is helpful (and ...


11

The content of a database is generally covered under copyright law, so broadly speaking… no. You cannot assume that copying and re-use is implicitly allowed by default. Almost all major countries follow the Berne Convention. In the US (for example), almost everything published after April 1989 is considered "copyrighted" by default and protected ...


10

The other answers so far are all terrific. I'll reiterate one point, and make a new one: The openness of an API is always important, but when complete, quality bulk data is available some of these access issues become a lot more tolerable. An API is not a substitute for bulk data. The federal government has become very API focused, and many of them have ...


10

Ideally, like @Andrew - OpenGeoCode mentions, you would release it in multiple formats. I would really suggest you look into organizing it into a e-book written in Markdown and hosted on Github. There are several advantages to this such as a built-in change log, being able to let people to (publicly) fork your document(s) and share their changes with the ...


8

Here are the three options listed on opendatacommons.org, the licenses FAQ also has a bunch of really good information. Public Domain Dedication and License (PDDL) — “The PDDL places the data(base) in the public domain (waiving all rights)” Attribution License (ODC-By) — “Attribution for data/databases” Open Database License (ODC-ODbL) — “Attribution Share-...


8

Regarding this question, I think this post by Denny Vrandečić (the project leader of Wikimedia's Wikidata) is well worth reading: https://plus.google.com/104177144420404771615/posts/cvGay9eDSSK Denny knows very well what he is talking about. I'll just quote the first sentences as a teaser: tl;dr - If you publish data, attach the CC0 license to it, but ...


7

The main benefit is moving the attribution requirement from being a legal part of the license, i.e. something that you MUST do, to being a norm, i.e. should that you OUGHT to do (to be polite). The reason why this is beneficial is because attribution can be difficult: Data publishers don't always indicate how they wish to be attributed Where they do, then ...


7

The Massachusetts Open Data Initiative seems to provide only a link to the data, not the data themselves. Their terms of use couldn't be really applied here. The terms and conditions of the Massachusetts Archives website refer to the documents, not to their data collections. As to historical vital records, this page states that "[t]he Archives' collections ...


7

Quick answer with what comes to my mind. They might be several others. Advantages Since you lower the barrier to access the data (no more scraping), you will see more people using it and new usage of your data will appear You will also receive feedback regarding your data quality (since there is more eyes looking at it under different angles) This can be a ...


7

Yes. CKAN is licensed under Affero GNU GPL v3.0. From the preamble to the license: When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you ...


7

Each of the datasets on Data.gov describes the license used (see the upper left items on the dataset page). The intent for data provided by the U.S. Government (whether it is on Data.gov or not) is to have an open license, as defined by Project Open Data. The license field in the Data.gov metadata schema is defined as well. In most cases, the license is "...


6

This is what Creative Commons themselves have to say on the topic: CC0, the public domain dedication, can also be used on databases. The effect is to waive all copyright and related rights in the database, placing it as close as possible into the worldwide public domain. In certain domains, such as science and government, there are important reasons to ...


6

To build on some of these answers, the important distinction to remember is that an API is a service, not the data itself. This will be a custom application that you will build, that will have methods for getting at the data in ways that you find useful (at least initially), and that will use the resources (bandwidth, computing power, etc..) that you are ...


6

It seems like http://echoprint.me/ is the service you want: Echoprint is a music fingerprint or music identification service. It listens to music signals and tells you what song is playing. It’s backed by a huge database of music that grows with the community and further partnerships. On launch we’ve partnered with Musicbrainz. ... Does ...


6

The other suggestions on here are great, and I would echo the recommendation to consider Github if you want people to be able to easily edit your product for creating their own versions. This will also help you track the edits that have been made so you can learn more about what people do with your manuals. If you want to learn more about the definitions ...


6

Yes, it is possible, using the Google Places API. Just for completeness sake: This is most definitely not open data. For an open alternative, have a look at Phil's answer about Open Street Maps. If your usage complies with Google's terms depends on what exactly you plan to do with the data. I guess section 10.1.3 of the Google Maps/Google Earth APIs Terms ...


5

As a data user, I feel it is essentially OK to make people register to obtain API keys. Those who use API for data access are by definition application developers (even if they aren't), and their apps may saturate network bandwidth and server resources if coded without due consideration for others. Angry letters to ISPs have the potential to shut down ...


5

I generally proscribe to the "Technocratic Utopianism" side of information politics, so I've been offended by needing to register to get data. My first thought on the matter was to allow for use without registering, but do something to rate-limit w/ a warning message if one group starts to get abusive ... probably based on individual IPs or IP ranges. ... ...


5

I believe minopret is incorrect on the use restriction of UN/LOCODE to non-commercial use w/o permission. There is no where on the UNECE site that indicates such a restriction. All the verbage would indicate the contrary. The terms of use simply indicate that the material is w/o warranty and the user will indemify the UN. This statement can be found on the ...


5

yes. the less barriers to accessibility, the easier it is to be consumed. the same principle applies to content. open.all.the.things.


5

On the licensing questions, you'd want to retain an IP attorney. Everyone above is correct to state that works by the US government are explicitly excluded under US Copyright Act protection, but there are several exceptions depending on how the data was collected, sourced, or modified by non-US government actors. For example, another issue Malamud has taken ...


5

This site helps to calculate the cost of living in different parts of the United States. There's a caveat about the fidelity and comprehensiveness of the data ("Consider the results a minimum cost threshold that serves as a benchmark, but only that."). For licensing, the site references that it is part of the Living Wage Project. However, in looking ...


5

Literal answer The Sui generis database right. It is a property right granted in several countries to creators, compilers or curators of databases. Prose answer To address your single points, here have some more text. Owning factual data: Probably not possible. License based on structure: yes, but for that, you must first have used suitables data sources ...


4

I'll address your last statement first. The process of methodically copying content from a website is known as "scraping". There has been at least one notable "scraping" lawsuit, Cvent vs Eventbrite (brief summary & some relevant court transcripts). Cvent sued Eventbrite for scraping data from their website, citing the anti-scraping language in its user ...


4

here's more of an opinion, not an answer: i'm free software all the way, and i wouldn't give a care to what their terms say, i'd do whatever i pleased with it, until they killed the service. in reality, corporations will destroy you, unless you have an army of lawyers too. look how broken the patent system is, or the hacker that exposed a public url and ...


4

Surprisingly, I can find no mention of license/patent/rights in the Hyperloop Alpha PDF published by Musk in 2013. In a tweet, Musk stated: I really hate patents unless critical to company survival. Will publish Hyperloop as open source. I sent an email to hyperloop@teslamotors.com inquiring. I'll update this answer if I hear back.


4

Assuming you comply with the license as regards attribution and labelling (ie, you indicate the author + the license in an appropriate way, such as an image caption) then you are free to do this. The CC license distinguishes between "derivative works"(1a), which need to get the CC-BY-SA license, and "collective works" (1c), which don't. Including one CC-BY-...


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