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11

As a work of the US government, there isn't any license appropriate for the work, because it's already in the public domain (in the United States). So a license like the Unlicense (or CC0), in which the licensor is entering the covered work into the public domain, doesn't work. Some text that acknowledges the public domain status in the US is helpful (and ...


3

You could allow users to upload/email .txt files containing queries, or upload URLs (e.g. pastebin, gist). Then your local code would read these .txt queries and add them to the repository (also standarized the query, validate the query, format the query, etc).


3

I see our support team responded to your support request you posted to support.socrata.com. The gist of the answer, for others' benefit, is that this is not currently supported but we are passing this feedback and request on to our product and marketing teams. If you are absolutely determined to do this, you can visit a chart such as https://data....


3

This ongoing discussion on the license for the White House Open Data Policy (Project Open Data) itself may shed some additional light on the issue. For information about the differences between the various licenses, choosealicense.com is an invaluable resource.


2

You should check out grlc grlc, the git repository linked data API constructor, automatically builds Web APIs using SPARQL queries stored in git repositories. Basically you use an github repository which stores all your queries. Based on it, a swagger doc is generated what is easy to browse through (even with tags and description)


2

From the FAQ (emphasis is mine): Who can participate in Project Open Data? Anyone – Federal employees, contractors, developers, the general public – can view and contribute to Project Open Data. It is possible to modify the content of the website as well as to contribute to the various tools offered on github by forking the projects. If your ...


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