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9

A few thoughts: For a simple and down to the point description, Brian's suggestion of MedlinePlus' Web Services is a good start however if you do a search such as http://wsearch.nlm.nih.gov/ws/query?db=healthTopics&term=Levodopa you'll notice that it returns generic information about Parkinkson's disease and not this more appropriate page at http://www....


7

It's hard to say without some more specific information, but RxNorm is probably the best place to start: (2nd section is download/API access) http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/umls/rxnorm/


5

What about MeSH? The MeSH Browser is an online vocabulary look-up aid available for use with MeSH® (Medical Subject Headings). It is designed to help quickly locate descriptors of possible interest and to show the hierarchy in which descriptors of interest appear. Virtually complete MeSH records are available, including the scope notes, ...


5

Emily you could check out the MedlinePlus Web Services - http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/webservices.html We used a simple search of Medline from the presentation of the adverse events drug name's in ResearchAE but the webservice might provide a bit more detail. Another option could be to check out NLM DailyMed - http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/...


4

As of right now, SPL (structured product labels) are not part of the openFDA list of APIs for drugs (https://open.fda.gov/drug/event/ - note how "product labels" is greyed out). You can learn more about the SPL standard, guidance, etc. directly from the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/DataStandards/StructuredProductLabeling/default.htm. While you wait ...


4

you haven't precised the country of which you want the drugs data. For France there is the Open Medic Database where you'll find data about every drugs available on the market, including consumption by zone area and indications/side effects given by the french health authorities (Haute Autorité Sanitaire). Not sure if it'll help but still interesting :)


4

Check out RxClass from the US National Institute of Health's National Library of Medicine: https://mor.nlm.nih.gov/RxClass : Example web UI query for all drugs that may_treat FEVER https://mor.nlm.nih.gov/RxClass/search?query=Fever|DISEASE&searchBy=class This web UI has a SOAP and RESTful API documented at http://rxnav.nlm.nih.gov/RxClassAPIs.html


4

This is perhaps a bit late, but I'm interested in this as well and have made some progress. With respect to drugs, the WHO has a lookup service for ATC codes: http://www.whocc.no/atc_ddd_index/ They also have a listing of International Non-proprietary Names: http://www.who.int/medicines/services/inn/en/ Various countries call these different things, but ...


3

The FDA CDER database, which you linked to, covers small molecule drugs. Monovisc is a medical device, so you'll need to search the medical device database: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfRL/rl.cfm


3

Download the JSON file and open it with a Json to CSV converter like http://www.convertcsv.com/json-to-csv.htm You will get this file.


3

The information you seek is in the Structured Product Label (SPL) that each drug labeller provides to the FDA. The SPL is free and available through an API provided by the National Library of Medicine's DailyMed web service. For more information visit: http://usgovxml.com/DataService.aspx?ds=DMEDWS Note: the web service has been updated to allow retrieval ...


2

I think you might be using the wrong query syntax for the openFDA API. Try: https://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json?&search=generic_name:hydrocodone Note the : instead of the = in the search value. More details are provided at https://open.fda.gov/api/#query-syntax


2

Have you tried looking into Open Knowledge International? https://discuss.okfn.org/c/projects/open-trials They seem to have a discussion board on clinical trial archives as well as a database on drugs.


2

There are a couple, but for me they don't have the level of data granularity to do the analysis I would like. It depends on the detail you need ... clinicaltrials.gov Consort - This is high level of analysis I believe. Oncology Trials


2

I actually found a suitable dataset from Side Effect Resource (SIDER) http://sideeffects.embl.de/ which contain both drug side effect and drug indication. It basically uses Stitch Id for drugs and UMLS Id for diseases in their dataset. To check stitch id, you can use PubChem to check based on the CID. To check umls id, you can use UMLS Terminology. Since I'...


2

It seems like your idea is possible using openFDA (or dailymed data which is where openFDA gets their SPL, Structured Product Label, data, I think), but it's not going to be necessarily easy. You can query for each and every label and extract the active_ingredients field form http://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json but it is a comma separated list and sometimes ...


2

After downloading the zip file, use only the "prescribable" portion. (that are drugs currently approved for use, without many "historical" drugs) The main file is RXCONSO.RRF which is 28MB. It has 113290 rows and contains many different types of rows (e.g., synonyms). To filter only ingredients, using R, do this: conso<-read.delim(file = 'RXNCONSO.RRF',...


2

Matching on Appl_No (APPLICATIONNUMBER in the new NDC format) is the correct strategy. Note that there are many categories of products in the NDC, and the Orange Book is restricted to small molecule drugs. So, you'll only find matches for NDAs, ANDAs, OTCs and a few others. But, importantly, not BLAs, and unapproved drugs.


2

chaohuang -- OpenFDA does not have an API for this dataset. And I can't find an API for it elsewhere either unfortunately. As a possible alternative approach, you may be able to implement a solution based on downloading the list as an Excel file. The tool supports Excel file downloads (Chose "Download Excel file" from the Output Format field), and (according ...


2

This document from fda.gov (saved via the Wayback Machine) states: This clinical study was compiled using Sinclair Wound and Skin Emulsion product as submitted in 510(k) # K024367. Atopiclair" is the working name for Sinclair Wound and Skin Emulsion in this study. Searching fda.gov for the working name provides some results I could be wrong about ...


1

Here is the corrected query: https://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json?search=spl_patient_package_insert:"Novartis"+AND+_exists_:spl_product_data_elements+AND+effective_time:[20110601+TO+20181231]&limit=1 You need to use +AND+ instead of & and _exists_ to ensure a particular field is present in the document. More information about the syntax of openFDA ...


1

You may want to explore using the APIs at openFDA (https://open.fda.gov/). I did a quick search of the Drug Product Labeling API and found matching records for Donnatal and for Androxy. Here are the API queries I ran: https://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json?search=openfda.brand_name:%22Donnatal%22 https://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json?search=openfda.brand_name:...


1

These are all special cases. RabAvert is a biologic, so it is be found in the CBER database, not the CDER database or the medical device database. Donnatal is an unapproved drug that was grandfathered in 1966 and is still on the market (why are unapproved drugs on the market, and what is the FDA doing to get them off? See our article ). You'll only find ...


1

I asked the same question of the FDA on August 2 this year. Here is a response. If anyone knows of such a repository, I'd be interested in some analysis. From: CDER DRUG SHORTAGES Sent: Wednesday, August 2, 2017 14:05 To: (Redacted) Subject: RE: Historical Drug Shortage Data Good Afternoon, For past shortage information, the best ...


1

drugbank.ca -which has listed over 11000 drugs- offers the possibility to filter for investigational drugs. see https://www.drugbank.ca/categories?utf8=%E2%9C%93&investigational=1&us=0&canada=0&eu=0&commit=Apply+Filter


1

There are a couple of reference sources for drugs, like WHO-DD (world health Organisation-drug dictionary), or INNs (international non-proprietary names) but to my knowledge these do not contain an explicit listing of drugs currently under test. Checking clinical trials dot gov shows there's also a database version of that data called AACT. It should be ...


1

I've tried to get the data from the link you provided(*zip file ~1mb) which contain some *.txt files. I looked into the products.txt, where two lines look like this: BUDESONIDE~AEROSOL, FOAM;RECTAL~UCERIS~VALEANT PHARMS INTL~2MG/ACTUATION~N~205613~001~~Oct 7, 2014~Yes~Yes~RX~VALEANT PHARMACEUTICALS INTERNATIONAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE~AEROSOL, FOAM;...


1

Unfortunately, Open FDA cannot assess safety of a particular drug interaction. To see if a drug has any interaction warnings, precaution, or contraindication, you can query the Drug Label API and inspect the SPL elements returned; for example: https://api.fda.gov/drug/label.json?search=openfda.brand_name:xanax&limit=10 "contraindications": [ "...


1

You can accomplish the same with RxNorm SOAP API 'getAllConceptsByTTY' where TTY = "BN" (brand name) and "BPCK" (brand name pack). DailyMed is also mapped to RxNorm, Going the DailyMed route is longer unless you want to extract information from the SPL using NLP. The other advantage of using the API is using get closest match function to normalize the ...


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