The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
8

The United Nation Statistics Division publishes population totals and by demographics per country on an annual basis. This is called the UN Demographic Yearbook. It is normally in PDF format, but there are various areas on the unstats.un.org site that you can download EXCEL and CSV files. A good start is here. This has downloadable tables between 2007 and ...


8

From an open-source point of view, there is no direct source for age/income/race/location as to which way an individual voted; this is by design that you cannot figure out who voted for whom. Having said this, you can get an estimate through a survey program that the US Census does. An overview of the results up to the 2014 elections is provided. ...


7

I think data.worldbank.org is going to be your best bet for getting this information. Here is a direct link to the indicator for "Adult literacy rate, population 15+ years, both sexes (%)" (SE.ADT.LITR.ZS) http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.ADT.LITR.ZS You can click "Databank" from that link to go to a table generator where you can limit your query ...


5

It's much too early to carry out this analysis today. As you say, the 40 weeks period has just passed by. You should not expect the data to be ready in real-time. I am even surprised that you have already found data for 2014. I had a quick look at the two authoritative sources for this kind of data. At the time of writing this answer, Destatis, the Federal ...


5

The US Census Bureau has an API for most of its datasets, which will allow you to retrieve state-based data in a structured form. You just have to request an API key. They provide examples for each of the datasets - a small and basic dataset like the Population Estimates might be a good place to start. This example shows you what you would get if you ...


5

http://citypopulation.de provides this population data for cities, but as best I can tell, there is no bulk download facility, and the specific years for which historic data is available varies widely from country to country. They don't seem to provide latitude/longitude data directly alongside their city population statistics, although they use maps ...


5

You can download the data from CNN in JSON format at: http://data.cnn.com/ELECTION/2016/full/P.full.json This is some of the data that powers the CNN's election web page. It has the outline shown below, with "races" containing results per state, and "polls" containing polling data: { "pages": [...], "race": "President", "races": [...], "...


5

Many states have posted the data on their election commission websites. The format varies from state to state. To answer your question about Open Elections, they pull their information directly from the state election commission.


5

This Paper provides tables of ownership estimates of dogs and cats for most world countries. There is a description of the collection methodology.


4

For UN Statistics, you will find it here. They have data per country going back to 1948. The age groups are broken down in 5 year segments. http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=POP&f=tableCode%3A22 I looked at the UN Population Division data link referenced in Kotebiya's answer. It could be the same data just packaged differently.


4

You could try a few of the following resources that I know of: The U.S. Census Bureau's International Data Base The U.N. Population Division also has a good resource, though it is available only in XLS format.


4

the american community survey is the principal annual estimate of the united states population. i think you are asking for https://www.census.gov/popest/schedule.html


4

It's not a sortable list, but the WHO keeps track of the mental health institutions per country and has a report on each country here: http://www.who.int/mental_health/evidence/atlas/profiles/en/ They also provide a shaded map in their atlas which I copied below. You'll have to look up the reports on the lightly shaded countries to check wether they have ...


4

That data isn't available from the government, but the next closest thing that is available is the exit polls. CNN lets you browse their exit poll results on their website.


4

If you are interested in using shapefile data and have access to QGIS or ArcGIS, this geodatabase contains geographic, demographic, and economic data for Places or "Cities" from the 2010 to 2014 ACS (The most current data as of December 1st, 2016). Be sure to find your variables of interest through the Metadata/Data Dictionary (although in your case, the ...


4

The Census API is pretty good and should have what you're looking for. If you want only recent data, you can use the ACS to get 2014 data. If you want more historical data, the 1990, 2000, and 2010 are all exposed via the API.


3

I don't know of a global database but Eurostat does provide some insights into European countries if that is of interest. You can find their tourism database here. If you navigate through tour_dem > tour_dem_tt > tour_dem_ttsd > tour_dem_ttsex you will find what you are looking for. The data is available for viewing in Eurostats interface or as a ...


3

ctrl + f on this page http://www.dhs.gov/immigration-statistics-publications for the text unauthorized


3

country.json should help you out on the country level: https://github.com/samayo/country.json


3

Try Geonames such as http://download.geonames.org/export/dump/ I am mobile so can't double check but quote sure they have top line population information edit: more info here: https://opendata.stackexchange.com/a/13081/1511


3

The University of California, Berkley has an interactive form for query social survey data they have compiled ('SDA: Survey Documentation and Analysis'). I don't know if they have a REST or other API interface. You can find it at this link: http://sda.berkeley.edu/ Their archives are at this link: http://sda.berkeley.edu/archive.htm The 1972-2010 ...


3

There are also academic surveys. Check ICPSR for open-access survey results.


3

Here are some additional studies that may be useful: Most likely meets most or all of your criteria: Americans' Changing Lives: Waves I, II, III, and IV, 1986, 1989, 1994, and 2002 (ICPSR 04690) May meet some of your criteria: You mentioned ARDA studies already, but the National Study of Youth and Religion (3 separate waves) may be helpful.


3

For Ireland between 1926 and 2006. The latest census in Ireland was in 2011 but they don't seem to have that much information yet. http://census.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=76965 Downloadable as csv and other formats.


3

I did a quick export of data from the 2014 5-year ACS of the population and median age of every ZIP code: https://numeracy.co/public/2lZ9jKZoehr


3

The Dutch Central Bureau for Genealogy has an interface where you can type a family name and it will show the geographical distribution of that name throughout the Netherlands. You can also enter a single letter and search for names containing that letter, so with some scraping you should be able to get quite a bit of data. You can find the search interface ...


3

I think geoba.se might interest you, although I'm not sure how reliable their sources are. Unfortunately, geoba.se doesn't have an API, but you could try to scrape the data yourself using code like the one found on this answer. When I have more time, I'll update this answer with a bit of code.


3

I downloaded http://www.gapminder.org/data/ after choosing "ALL" and noticing the spreadsheet links end in "output=xlsx". I changed the xlsx to csv to see what would happen, and did, indeed, get CSV files as expected. More specifically, I ran: perl -nle 'while (s/href="(.*?)"//) {$x=$1; $x=~s/\&amp\;/&/g; print "curl -LO \47$x\47"}' gapminder.html | ...


3

FIDE rating lists are available to download on this page. The standard rating list contains both rating and sex information. Your hypothesis is interesting, but it seems not very easy to test it, because FIDE Elo rating distribution has many abnormalities. Here below are comparative density plots with and without filtering by K-factor: library(ggplot2) ...


3

I'm posting here the results of my analysis so far. If this is not an appropriate place for this, let me know. The actual answer to my question is here, where you can find a very large database of mostly German players, with some international ones. My analysis follows closely the analysis done in this paper, with a few tweaks that I'll discuss as needed. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible