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62

This is the kind of thing that the csvkit was built for: csvgrep -c "Healthcare Provider Taxonomy Code_1" -r '^282N' npidata_20050523-20131110.csv > hospitals.csv csvkit is a suite of utilities for converting to and working with CSV, the king of tabular file formats. A little more efficiently, you could do: zcat NPPES_Data_Dissemination_Nov_2013....


26

On Windows, SweetScape 010 Editor is the best application I am aware of to open/edit large files (easily up to 25 GB). It took around 10 seconds on my computer to open your 4 GB file (SSD): More such tools: Text editor to open big (giant, huge, large) text files


17

As you're only taking a portion of the file, you may be able to use simple tools to subset it before processing. That may get it down to a reasonable size to work with. If you're working on a posix (ie, unix-like) system, you can use shell commands to reduce the file: zcat -cfilename| grep(pattern to match hospitals only)>outputFile This lets you ...


14

you can connect to the file with sql and run your analysis from there. i have written extremely detailed r code (r is free and open source) about how to work with the nppes from your laptop here: http://asdfree.com/national-plan-and-provider-enumeration-system-nppes.html if you have never used r before, check out http://twotorials.com for a crash course ...


11

Others have mentioned way to pull apart this file incrementally. It seems to me like you are also commenting on use of resources for a large file. For some solutions you can incrementally read the compressed file uncompressing as you go and feed it through the csv module. For example in python with gzip'd input you would do this by: import csv import ...


10

There are streaming CSV parsers, that only look at a small window of the file at a time. Node is a particularly stream-friendly language and ecology, so here a few Node streaming CSV parsers: https://github.com/voodootikigod/node-csv https://github.com/koles/ya-csv https://github.com/lbdremy/node-csv-stream


9

Well my comment received a number of up votes which I take as a signal of quality and I am posting the links here so they are more visible to future visitors: opendata.socrata.com - you can upload a number of different file types here, create visualizations, link to them, and take advantage of a very mature set of APIs for data consumption and publishing ...


8

On Windows, there is also a software called Delimit ("Open data files up to 2 billion rows and 2 million columns large!") http://delimitware.com For instance it can split, sort and extract only some rows or columns.


8

Turns out there is a function daylength in the geosphere package in R that calculates day length for any latitude and date.


7

Load the file into PostgreSQL database table with a Copy statement. This will give you the full capabilities of SQL syntax, plus the ability to index columns for faster access. For complex queries you have a optimizer that a can figure out the fastest way to access the data. PostgreSQL has smarter I/O than most applications it will detect sequential ...


6

This answer is not really useful for non-programmers, but if could manage some programming in perl, the Parse::CSV module is especially designed for this task. From the doc: It provides a flexible and light-weight streaming parser for large, extremely large, or arbitrarily large CSV files. Perl is usually very good for data mining tasks.


6

There is not a lot of good nation-wide data on LGBT topics. Here are a few I was able to find for you. Some of them are already in CSV/TSV and/or Excel format (and therefore trivial to convert to CSV) while some are PDF reports with tables embedded (which, given some effort, could be converted to CSV/TSV tables): XLS Census/ACS data on same-sex couples: ...


5

Well, in short, Talend Open Studio for Data Integration is an ETL. It can be used for many use cases, including data migration, files processing, etc. You can easily build jobs using a visual editor to combine specialized connectors (read CSV files, select rows corresponding to your criteria, write result to one or more files or directly to a database, and ...


5

I have used utilities such as (g)awk to readlarge file such as this record by record. I the extract the required information from each line and write it to an output file. For windows users (g)awk is available in cygwin. I have also used python to achieve the same result. You could implement this process in most programming languages.


5

The National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) is an XML-based system for defining "data in motion" (i.e., an on-the-wire format.) What distinguishes NIEM is 2 things: it is for standardizing the semantics of the exchange, not just the syntax; and it as much a process model as it is a technical model. That is, it (the NIEM organization) has developed a ...


5

If you're on Windows, I can't sing the praises of LogParser high enough. It allows you to query files in a wide variety of formats (mostly log formats as that's what it was meant for, but XML and CSV are valid). You query the file with a surprisingly complete SQL syntax, and you can even use it to import an entire file directly into an SQL database very ...


5

The csvkit python library is great for transforming big csv datasets in the style of a unix command line tool (like sed). It has many small utilities that do one thing well each so you can compose them in helpful ways. In your case, csvcut can extract certain columns from a csv. From their docs: Extract columns named “TOTAL” and “State Name” (in that ...


4

I recently had to parse the 6GB NPPES file and here is how I did it: $ wget http://download.cms.gov/nppes/NPPES_Data_Dissemination_July_2017.zip $ unzip NPPES_Data_Dissemination_July_2017.zip $ split -l 1000000 npidata_20050523-20170709.csv $ add headers... $ python parse.py $ load *.tab files to the database The code for the parse.py script used to ...


4

A hopeful candidate is Dat, which aspires to become what Git (and GitHub) is for code. With this in mind, searching for "git for data" yields a lot of interesting results. In that context, the article We Don't Need a GitHub for Data is an good read which stresses the thought that it's (almost) never data that needs versioning, but data transformations - ...


4

I am a big fan of tad which crunches these kind of files easily.


4

I have recently started using the Linked CSV proposed standard for generating CSV files from plural data sources. Below is a vocabulary definition for the columns/data types I am using. Perhaps others will find this useful/interesting approach: http://www.opengeocode.org/cude1.1/LinkedCSV-Vocab.php Update: the above link throws a 404, however it is ...


4

Some time on Google brought up this list of 8902 Starbucks around the US: http://www.gpspassion.com/forumsen/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=67416 Here it is as a gist: https://gist.github.com/dankohn/09e5446feb4a8faea24f


4

I don't think it is possible (from a read of faq, about) there seems to be no way to download data. Have a look at alternative data sources in another question, but of these I would use the Johns Hopkins github data, which is a daily updated csv.


3

Assuming that you can uncompress the online archive, your best approach might be to: split the uncompressed 4GB csv into smaller files and then extract the information interested, spool these rows into output-csv files and finally join those output-csv files back into one csv file for further processing. You can then use this file e.g. with SQL ...


3

It looks like Jeni Tennison took her Linked CSV spec to the W3C, and with some help from Gregg Kellogg and Ivan Herman it evolved into the Model for Tabular Data and Metadata on the Web and the Metadata Vocabulary for Tabular Data that both appeared as a W3C candidate recommendation on 16 July, 2015. Altogether, four CSV-related recommendations have appeared;...


3

The Data Documentation Initiative provides the DDI metadata standard for describing data dictionaries. http://www.ddialliance.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_Documentation_Initiative The DDI standard is broadly used and maintained by a large consortium of Universities and government organizations.


3

scraperwiki lets you do this, plus push to ckan databases. there are limitations for free accounts. it will break your huge file up into multiple csvs. google drive also lets you do this, a little bit more limited, but you can still do what you want by creating a new doc (spreadsheet) and then importing your data. tabula is another sweet tool, published by ...


3

Knoema is the free to use public and open data platform for users with interests in statistics and data analysis, visual storytelling and making infographics and data-driven presentations


3

The FDIC has a data download of all finanically insured banks and their branch offices in the US. The data does not have though website and phone number. It does have name, address, institution type, deposits. https://www2.fdic.gov/IDASP/warp_download_all.asp The FDIC dataset on Data.gov has some additional fields, including website (but not phone): http:/...


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