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7

Two resources you might consider are: The European Social Survey The Comparative Study of Electoral Systems


7

I think data.worldbank.org is going to be your best bet for getting this information. Here is a direct link to the indicator for "Adult literacy rate, population 15+ years, both sexes (%)" (SE.ADT.LITR.ZS) http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.ADT.LITR.ZS You can click "Databank" from that link to go to a table generator where you can limit your query ...


6

The World Health Organization Mortality Database is probably what you're looking for.


6

The U.S. Census Bureau is relied upon across the country for economics, demographics, research, and planning purposes. It builds itself to be used in many ways. It already handles a high load of traffic (The ACS which handles can be completed online for millions of survey respondents). Future endeavors of the Census Bureau aspire to handle loads of traffic ...


5

The ACS is a rolling annual sample. They take the sample for the entire year (about 3.5 million addresses in 2013) and divide it into 12 equal, monthly samples, and they mail out forms every month. So unlike the 10 year census (which is on April 1st) there is no effective date for the ACS. The analogy they use is that the 10-year census is like a snapshot (...


4

you are looking for ipums international. https://international.ipums.org/international/ easiest to analyze with http://www.asdfree.com/2015/11/laptop-friendly-analysis-of-census-of.html


4

Most countries of the world have a Department of Statistics where they compile Census data. The various world census datasets, like CIA WFB, UN statistics, and Worldbank get their information from these countries. CIA WFB: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2119.html UNSTATS: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic/products/...


4

According to this FAQ entry, TIGER/Line Files and Shapefiles through 2014 Cartographic Boundary Files – Shapefiles through 2014 Partnership Shapefiles – through 2014 Were all delivered in ISO-8859-1 (latin1), and TIGER/Line Files and Shapefiles 2015* Cartographic Boundary Files – Shapefiles 2015* Partnership Shapefiles – 2015* While 2015 and later is UTF-...


4

Block level data for the 2000 Census is included in the Summary File 1 (SF1) release here: https://www2.census.gov/census_2000/datasets/Summary_File_1/ The rather impenetrable technical docs for the SF1 release can be found here. Each state has a "geoheader" file and 39 segmented files which together contain all of the tables for all of the geographies in ...


4

Based on their FAQ https://www.neighborhoodatlas.medicine.wisc.edu/ it looks like they are using 2009-2013 American Community Survey data. In which case, it is best to use the 2013 version of the block group shapefiles from the US Census Bureau, per https://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/maps-data/data/tiger/How_do_I_choose_TIGER_vintage.pdf For ACS data, use ...


3

The Census Bureau offered a tool for exactly this purpose, but it was discontinued as of last fall's data release. (See p. 3 of the Users Guide PDF) Your reference to "API" is unclear. Are you a programmer who wants to automate the retrieval of data in Excel format? If that was a more casual use of the word, then you can use the American Fact Finder (which ...


3

The United Nations Statistical Division publishes an annual yearbook of statistics (including birth/death rates) by country. The latest addition is 2012 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic/products/dyb/dyb2012.htm


3

The CIA's World Factbook contains everything you ask except it has data for only one year.


3

I came across an overview of employees (including demographics such as gender and migratory background) provided by the employment agency. Unfortunately one needs to pay 36 EUR to get it. Please check the following Excel for more details. And there is another source that might be even more helpful. Check https://www.regionalstatistik.de. The topic number 12 ...


3

Access to microdata (and block level data) from the 2011 Census in Germany is subject to some restrictions. Microdata is only available via an on-site access in a "Research Data Center". Access to the data costs 250 EUR and has to be for scientific purposes. You have to be affiliated with a "scientific institution", and this institution has to be ...


3

The European Values Study provides this information. The microdata is freely available. You can consider it as a substitute to the European Social Survey mentioned in this same thread. Or as a complement, if you want to check the robustness of your findings.


3

Both the Brazilian Community CKAN instance http://br.ckan.net/dataset and the Brazilian Government's official Data Portal (CKAN-powered) which you link to, have APIs. There's also the World Bank API: http://data.worldbank.org/


3

Check this collection of static and real-time data sets: http://www.oecd.org/statistics. Most indicators should be on a per-country (including per-EU-country) basis. Also, see: http://data.worldbank.org and http://data.worldbank.org/products/wdi (for R there is WDI package) http://data.un.org/DataMartInfo.aspx http://www.google.com/publicdata/directory


3

There's are a number of studies on various 'birthday effects' in economics literature. I don't know of any that use open data, but you could contact the authors for help in your research. Here's an example from the genre. http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2241677


3

Something like this? You can find the spreadsheet on the bottom of the page.


3

You're correct in that census tracts only change, if at all, after an official U.S. Census, which only occurs once per decade. It seems to me that the user interface on FactFinder obscures this fact by forcing you to select the year you're looking for before the granularity of geography. Although year to year census tracts do not change, it is possible that ...


2

You could use dbpedia and its sparql endpoint for this. The following SPARQL query would return all metrics except crime rates, you asked for. PREFIX dbo: <http://dbpedia.org/ontology/> PREFIX dbr: <http://dbpedia.org/resource/> PREFIX dbp: <http://dbpedia.org/property/> SELECT * WHERE { ?city rdf:type dbo:City . ?city foaf:...


2

This page is pretty helpful: http://api.census.gov/data.html Dataset name, description, link to geography list, link to variables list, documentation, API url, API examples. You can't exactly see all variables/geography combinations at once in a machine-readable way, but it's a good start.


2

The two commercial databases to visit are: InfoGroup: These guys consolidate information on residents, including demographics and where you buy your cat food. Go to your library to run queries. Woodes & Poole: These guys provide a no nonsense product at a fee, but I have had no problems with their products. Here is a link for the 2015 estimates of MSA'...


2

You can check the Census Bureau's documentation here - look at the Subject Definition file, page 63 under Employment Status: http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/technical-documentation/code-lists.html They define the Labor Force as: "All people classified in the civilian labor force plus members of the U.S. Armed Forces". So the labor force ...


2

As best I can tell, ACS table B23001 does not have data down to the block group level. It's probably the case that the sample sizes are too small to meet the Census Bureau's data quality standards. You could use Census Tracts, but even there, margins of error are often problematic. Since you plan to add sub-estimates, the MOEs may settle down a little. It'...


2

Sorry to be a bummer, but I don't think it exists. For anything at census tract level you (almost always) need to go to either the SF1 files or the ACS files from census.gov. SF1 are just demographics, ACS are a little more of the 'other' stuff. The 5 year survey has the highest granularity. http://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/summary_file/2010/...


2

As a student of demography myself, my professor's often treat the effective date as the midpoint of the survey period. So for a 1-year survey period, the estimate would be said to be July 1st of that year. When you start getting into 5-year survey periods, the flaws in thinking of the survey as a point-in-time estimate become more apparent. As fdonnelly has ...


2

There is no more reliable database than Human Mortality Database -- mortality.org. This database is run by demographers who use state-of-the-art methodology to overcome issues in the data. As the result, the estimates are as precise as possible. Their methods protocol is a masterpiece of demographic data processing. On the down side, the data of decent ...


2

Both the United Nations Statistical Division and World Bank maintain databases related to population, and other vital statistics, for each country in the world. The data is collected from each country's equivalent of Department of Statistics. UNSD: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic/products/dyb/dybcensusdata.htm World Bank: http://data.worldbank.org ...


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