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Question for you guys, especially travelers like me do you prefer GPS or printable maps? I don't know but from my latest trip, GPS wasn't much of help. I had to resort to pdf maps from this site http://vectormap.info/ which have been very useful.

closed as off-topic by philshem, albert, ldodds, ojdo, Daniel Miller Oct 17 '16 at 15:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about open data within the scope defined in the help center." – philshem, ldodds, Daniel Miller
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Do you have your own smartphone like IPhone ? that should help you but I know in some areas they won't show up due to lack of coverage. How do you use this PDF ? What is the purpose for using your GPS ? What kind of GPS do you have ? – PROBERT Oct 5 '16 at 18:21
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because spam o rama – albert Oct 5 '16 at 21:43
  • I only use GPS on smartphone, Samsung not iPhone :( – Maria Tolsa Oct 6 '16 at 6:11
  • Ok, It seems like the GPS on smartphone are not always correct. Sometimes it takes a while for it calibrate itself. Have you looked up GPS apps on your Samsung ? – PROBERT Oct 6 '16 at 14:32
  • If you or Lalu have any connection to the maps that you are promoting here then I think you should disclose that before posing a question to which you want to propose them as a solution.. – PolyGeo Oct 6 '16 at 21:38
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I always bring a GPS and two paper maps: one in my mapcase around my neck, and a backup map in my rucksack, in case I lose my mapcase including map. The screen on a GPS receiver is far too small for wilderness navigation, it relies on batteries and on coverage (can be problematic in narrow canyons). If I had to choose one I would certainly take only the paper map. A paper map always works.

Of course, the importance of either depends on where you are hiking. I usually hike off-trail and navigate based on streams, lakes, and mountains. The GPS is mostly a toy, but can save a lot of time in dense fog. When you're hiking on well-signposted trails in an American state park or in the vicinity of Swiss towns such as Zermatt and Grindelwald, you don't really need either a GPS or a map. I still take both (although in this case just one copy of the map), but I'm a topographic map nerd who takes one even when it's essentially useless.

  • Exactly, screen too small haha but thanks for your answer I'm learning a lot here :) – Maria Tolsa Oct 6 '16 at 6:13

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