I am interested in the looking at the effects of respiratory medications and am having trouble tracking down the administration of Ipratropium Bromide. You can see from this count from the prescription table that it is almost as common a prescription as albuterol (another drug administered via nebuliser):

|           drug_name_generic           |  count |
| --------------------------------------| -------|
|       Albuterol 0.083% Neb Soln       |  22300 |
|        Ipratropium Bromide Neb        |  18838 |

However, while albuterol administration has a very clear chartevent associated with it:

|              label             |  itemid |          value         |
| -------------------------------| --------| -----------------------|
|  Small Volume Neb Drug/Dose #1 |  227570 |  Albuterol 0.083% unit |
|  Small Volume Neb Drug/Dose #1 |  227570 |   Atrovent 0.02% dose  |
|  Small Volume Neb Drug/Dose #1 |  227570 |  Albuterol 0.083% unit |

(sample from a join of chartevents and d_items) I have not been able to find any similar item in chartevents for Ipratropium Bromide. There is itemid 446, which has some values that look like it might have references to Ipratropium Bromide:

|         label        |  itemid |   value  |
| ---------------------| --------| ---------|
|  Micro-Neb Treatment |   446   |   alb/ip |
|  Micro-Neb Treatment |   446   |  alb/ipr |
|  Micro-Neb Treatment |   446   |  ipa/alb |

but there isn't nearly enough to acount for the Ipratropium Bromide prescriptions.

Is there another table, or some other chartevent in which the administration of this drug might be recorded?

I have spoken to a medical colleague and they say that the administration of a nebuliser should be recorded somewhere.

Thank you for your help; apologies if this isn't the appropriate forum for this question.

It turns out that Atrovent is the trade name of Ipratropium Bromide

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipratropium_bromide

so probably the Small Volume Neb Drug/Dose #1 | Atrovent 0.02% dose chart events mark the administration of this medicine.

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