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I'd like to analyze some changes in time. Is there a way to get free aerial or high quality satellite images from one place in different times of the day - for example one for each hour?

I'm not interested in any specific area, instead I want many high quality (high resolution) timestamped images from one arbitrary inhabited area.

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    If you want hourly data, you're probably limited to some very specific research projects where they flew balloons or planes over one area. – Swier Dec 2 '16 at 9:41
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There's various Earth imagery programs, Landsat is one of them. Some of these programs can be found here: http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/

Select under 'data sets' either the aerial imagery or landsat, then you can select the area and download the images.

Due to the fact that a given satellite has limited resolution and takes only so many pictures per minute, generally, the higher the detail of the images you want, the longer the time in between the images is going to be.

That being said, these images being from a US agency, my guess is the orbits of the satellites chosen in a way that coverage of the US is good, so try an area somewhere in the US.

  • The problem is that images from there are not timestamped (only date) – Fido Dec 8 '16 at 12:22
  • @Fido Landsat data has a metadata file (.MTL) that contains timestamps. Landsat has a 16 day repeat orbit, so it won't be capturing the same area in the same day. – Logan Byers Jan 6 '17 at 16:14
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Depending on what you consider high resolution, the GOES-16 imagery might satisfy you. You can get hourly imagery. Though, it is not archived data so you will probably have to capture your own images. There is an animated viewer here that allows you to zoom in to your area of interest. Give it a little while to load up all the frames before the animation plays successfully. The main site is here. Credits to NOAA, RAMBB, and CIRA.

  • Thank you for your effort! I'm afraid that I'm looking for a more detailed pictures though. – Fido Oct 18 '17 at 14:07

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