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I'm writing a program that requires a list of English words, such as that used by a spell checker. I have been unable to find any such word lists whatsoever, even after trying 2 search engines.

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5 Answers 5

You can download an Aspell Dictionary, then convert it to simple list of words:

aspell -d en dump master | aspell -l en expand > my.dict

A few other dictionaries.

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Use wordnet, it's an academic project but a de facto for various purposes including the one you asked for. There are also higher semantics modeled that you can use for various functions.

It's also convenient to query and integrate it into your app.

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If you're on a Mac, there's a list of words, 1 per line, in the file /usr/share/dict/words. The usr folder is hidden by default, but you can view it by following the following steps:

  1. Open the Finder.

  2. In the menu, go to Go->Go to Folder or press Cmd-Shift-G.

  3. In the box, type /usr/share/dict.

  4. You'll see a list of files. Copy the file called words to whatever location you need it in.

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I tried that, but there are many words not in it. –  tbodt Jul 14 at 22:51

If you're trying to use Google, the general terms to use would be :

From the linguisitics community:

For the password cracking community :

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Password crackers are also utilizing Twitter and Facebook now to incorporate the latest slang and idioms. –  Sun W Kim Jul 8 at 18:31

Ask around on the Omega Wiki, formerly known as the Ultimate Wiktionary or WiktionaryZ. They have all the data from all the various wiktionaries in a relational database. This means that they also have inflected and conjugated forms, comparatives/superlatives and whatnot. And not just for English. Basically they can produce pretty much any list you like, and indeed (if you wish) not just a list but structured data.

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