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This is a question I found on /r/datasets. Does OpenData have any answers to add?

I'm looking for a large collection or resumes and preferably knowing whether they are employed or not. Does such a dataset exist?

Link to reddit post

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3 Answers 3

indeed.com has a résumé site (but unfortunately no API like the main job site). You can build URLs with search terms:

http://www.indeed.com/resumes/data-science

With these HTML pages you can find individual CVs, i.e. link. You can search by country by using the same structure, just replace the .com domain with another (i.e. indeed.de/resumes)

The HTML for each CV is relatively easy to scrape, with human readable tags that describe the CV section:

<div class="work_company" >
...
<p class="work_description">

Check out libraries like python's BeautifulSoup for scraping tools and techniques.

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I doubt that it exists and, if it does, whether it should: after all CVs are personal data.

Perhaps you can contact the authors of this study:

Are Emily and Greg More Employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination

They might be willing to share their dataset of fictitious resumes.

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....linkedin..pretty sure its one of their main reasons for being. you can play with their api and access users resumes.
i'm not sure if they offer full access or what, but you could just suck down as many as possible per setting, saving them...
not sure, but elance probably has one as well;
if there's not an open source one, find a huge slab of web data recently crawled, you could use commoncrawl's data for exactly this purpose; then just crawl looking for hresume microformats data...you'll find a ton, although the most recent numbers have shown a dramatic shift in schema.org users, and i'm sure that's where you'll want to search more and more in the future. i can't remember 100%, but there were still 300 or 400% more micformatted resumes on the web, than schema...the report was very recent. here's linkedin's developer api, and a link to commoncrawl, and crawling for hresume: https://developer.linkedin.com/search/node/resume
http://www.recruitmentdirectory.com.au/Blog/using-the-linkedin-api-a304.html
http://commoncrawl.org/

i actually found this trying to find a good explanation for parsing microformats. i think this is easier to understand:
http://beyondplm.com/2013/06/10/why-plm-should-care-web-data-commons-project/

EDIT: i actually just found this resume crawler...i searched for javascript near va. beach, and my a bunk resume on my site came up first...it shouldn't be indexed, so idk if that's good or bad, but check it out:
http://www.theresumecrawler.com/search.aspx

EDIT 2: here's details of web commons crawler release:
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-vocabs/2014Apr/0002.html

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1  
When you have lots of different answers, it's sometimes better to break them into more than one answer, rather than keep appending. (yes, I know I'm often guilty of doing the same thing) –  Joe May 3 at 10:20
    
i think these are related, but i agree with you. i also have no qualms cleaning up stuff here. its still so very new and shiny, i'd like it to be sparkling in the future, when the masses come for the answers –  albert May 3 at 17:13

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